Research news

New minimally invasive, cost-effective method shows promise in treating cancer without harming healthy cells

Purdue University researchers have developed a minimally invasive technique that may help doctors better explore and treat cancerous cells, tissues and tumors without affecting nearby healthy cells.


Zhu stressesCRISPR-edited rice plants produce major boost in grain yield

A team of scientists from Purdue University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has used CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology to develop a variety of rice that produces 25-31 percent more grain and would have been virtually impossible to create through traditional breeding methods.


Bae cradleTechnology turns smartphones into on-the-spot detectors for foodborne illnesses, other dangerous contaminants

Purdue University researchers have developed detection technology that allows a typical smartphone to analyze produce for foodborne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, which has been linked to a deadly outbreak in romaine lettuce.


Method for identifying key regulator genes may speed improvements in fertilizer use and other efficiencies

When a plant is introduced to an abundant patch of water or fertilizer, a cascade of genetic and molecular actions lead to beneficial physiological responses such as root development and increased biomass. Identifying the genes involved in the early molecular responses has been difficult, but a Purdue University scientist has led an effort that can identify the genetic mechanisms and predict targets for improving crop plants.


Satellite imageHeat and sound wave interactions in solids could run engines, refrigerators

A solid can serve as a medium for heat and sound wave interactions just like a fluid does for thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators – resulting in leak-free machines that can stay operating longer.


Robles batteriesMaking safer and more powerful lithium-ion batteries requires the right recipe

A Purdue University team has published research that examines the relationship between the active and inactive elements of lithium-ion batteries, and how the micro- and nano-structure of their respective ingredients reflects on the performance and safety of the batteries.


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